NBA 20 second timeouts

May 23, 2008 at 8:47 am 4 comments

NBA time out

Watching the Pistons/Celtics game last night I was agitated. The last 2 minutes of a basketball game always take 10-15 minutes to finish. 5 seconds of play, foul. 3 more seconds, timeout. And the NBA attempts to keep these breaks short:

Each team gets six full (100-second) timeouts per game, plus one 20-second timeout per half. You can take only three of those full timeouts in the fourth quarter, and only two of those can come in the last two minutes. In close games, teams will call for time as often as you’ll let them. (Source).

The 20 second timeout however, which was called by both teams last night, ended up taking 90 and 91 seconds between the timeout call and time in. There’s no reason the 20 second timeout should take nearly 5 times as long as allocated to execute.

Boo to the timeout and it’s energy drain.

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Entry filed under: Complaints, Realizations. Tags: , , , .

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4 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Richard  |  May 23, 2008 at 10:17 am

    Aren’t there special timeouts for media? What are the rules for broadcast timeouts?

    Reply
  • 2. steveconroy  |  May 23, 2008 at 10:52 am

    There must be two 100-second timeouts in the first and third periods and three 100-second timeouts in the second and fourth periods. If neither team has taken a timeout prior to 5:59 of the first or third period, it shall be mandatory for the Official Scorer to take it at the first dead ball and charge it to the home team. If no subsequent timeouts are taken prior to 2:59, it shall be mandatory for the Official Scorer to take it and charge it to the team not previously charged. If neither team has taken a timeout prior to 8:59 of the second or fourth period, a mandatory timeout will be called by the Official Scorer and charged to neither team. If there are no subsequent timeouts taken prior to 5:59, it shall be mandatory for the Official Scorer to take it at the first dead ball and charge it to the home team. If no subsequent timeouts are taken prior to 2:59, it shall be mandatory for the Official Scorer to take it and charge it to the team not previously charged. The Official Scorer shall notify a team when it has been charged with a mandatory timeout. Any additional timeouts in a period beyond those which are mandatory shall be 60 seconds. No regular or mandatory timeout shall be granted to the defensive team during an official’s suspension-of-play for (1) a delay-of-game warning, (2) retrieving an errant ball, (3) an inadvertent whistle, or (4) any other unusual circumstance.

    Reply
  • 3. Kozmo Kramer  |  May 23, 2008 at 11:43 pm

    HOCKEY is the only sport that hasn’t been ruined by an inordinate amounts of extra time and time outs in the last 5 minutes of play. If there are 2 minutes left in a hockey game, you can almost bet that in 3 minutes, the game is over. Football and basketball time out rules have ruined the game and the momentum. If you can not win a game in the first 98% of the time allotted, why give a team 10 more chances to win by extending the end of the game by what seems to be 15 minutes???? And while we are on the “sports subject”….don’t ruin baseball by putting the instant replay into effect. Amen!

    Reply
  • 4. jeff  |  June 17, 2008 at 9:25 am

    basebal has yet to be ruined, and pleeeeeeeeeeeeeeease improve baseball by putting instant replay into effect. I know the day Philly gets “screwed” on a call, Kozmo will be charged up about baseball officials incompetance, so take the guess work out. Replay is only for home runs clearing the wall and fair/foul. Get it right, no harm no foul. Its a centralized office, one Upm in NY watching the play. IT won’t delay the game any more than a pitching change….want to rid the game of those?

    Reply

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